Haiku for clementines

Yesterday I made a list of items in my refrigerator. We have an abundance of hummus right now. And we have 7 clementines. I adore clementines. I’m not big on oranges or grapefruits, but I could write poetry about clementines. So I did. Here’s my haiku about the clementines in my fridge:

tiny clementines
my orange bursts of sunshine
all seven are mine

Try writing a haiku about something. Maybe something in your fridge.

The basic structure is 5 syllables, 7 syllables, 5 syllables. Here’s more about haiku if you want to dig deeper: How to Write Haiku

Why writing matters right now

When I start workshops, I usually tell those gathered that writing is good for our health. Giving voice to the swirling thoughts in our heads can lower our blood pressure. It boosts t-cell production and strengthens our immunity. Those wellness benefits often seem like bonus points. But not now. Physical health is not a given during a pandemic. As the days isolating at home (or working overtime for some heroes) start to stretch out, the need to take care of our individual and collective mental health becomes even greater.

I’m not doing well with my writing habits right now. News, social media, and converting work to online everything – all seem more pressing. I can feel my anxiety rising. Maybe you can too. That’s why I’m dusting off this website and wanna-be writing business I began with some baby steps two years ago. I’m going to start sending out writing prompts so we can write alone or in company with one another. It’s mostly for myself. But I’d love to have you join me.

Here’s a prompt to start from Mary Oliver:

To live in this world

you must be able
to do three things:
to love what is mortal;
to hold it

against your bones knowing
your own life depends on it;
and, when the time comes to let it go,
to let it go.
~from “In Blackwater Woods” by Mary Oliver, from American Primitive. © Back Bay Books, 1983.

Friends, what are you letting go of today?

Be well,

Julie

An antidote to loneliness

“Picking up a pen can be a powerful intervention against loneliness. I am a strong believer in writing as a way for people who are feeling lonely and isolated to define, shape, and exchange their personal stories. Expressive writing, especially when shared, helps foster social connections. It can reduce the burden of loneliness among the many groups who are most at risk, including older adults, caregivers, those with major illnesses, those with disabilities, veterans, young adults, minority communities of all sorts, and immigrants and refugees.”

~ Jeremy Noble, MD, MPH

Check out Jeremy’s full article, Writing as an Antidote to Loneliness on the Harvard Health blog.

You are an artist

“Whether your purpose for writing is artistic expression, communication with friends and family, the healing of the inner life, or achieving public recognition for your art — the foundation is the same: the claiming of yourself as an artist/writer and the strengthening of your writing voice through practice, study, and helpful response from other writers.”

~Pat Schneider, Founder of Amherst Writers & Artists

writing alone and with othersPat’s masterpiece, Writing Alone & With Others, published by Oxford University Press, is full.

Full of writing advice. Full of stories about how writing can change lives. Full of inspiration to write to change your own life. Full of prompts to get your writing going with creativity and new energy.

Pick up a copy here. Then look for a group to write with in company, so you can develop your art to its fullest.